In the winter of 1999, I found myself on a Greyhound bus travelling from Three Rivers, Michigan to Richmond Hill, Ontario. I was moving to L’Arche Daybreak, one of the many communities of people considered intellectually disabled and nondisabled who share life and faith together. A little excited and a little frightened, I went looking for Christian community and a way to live the Gospel. I wound up finding both those things – and a whole lot more. Read More →

Adolescence is a challenging time for many young people, and with today’s complexities – in part due to rapid technological advancement and 24/7 connectivity – it has only become an increasingly tricky season of life to navigate. Add to this the potential social stigma, barriers, and support needs that come with visible and invisible disabilities and mental health challenges, and it is no wonder that youth pastors and practitioners are hungry for relevant training and resources in this area. Read More →

The strength of this book is the way in which it portrays people with all kinds of disabilities so that various differences in appearance and ability may not seem so strange. It suggests that we should look with our hearts and that the desire to understand someone’s appearance or abilities should be motivated by kindness. This principle is reminiscent of (insert Scripture reference?) Which says, “people look at the outward appearance but God looks at the heart.” Read More →